Moseley Bog Vlog

I went out to do some recording at Moseley Bog early this morning, so I thought I’d document what I got up to and show a little bit of what I managed to capture while I was there. Thankfully the weather held out – absolutely no wind or rain – and I was able to get some great recordings. Not the most professional video I’ll admit, but I hope you enjoy!

London pieces – War and nature

Adam West
Flavour of Tears
Magritte

This week we settled on our final pieces of art and had a great time defacing them with adjectives! I am now well underway with the conception and implementation stage of my work having decided that the political aspect of this piece, especially that to do with the second world war, is to be my focus.

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My work is going to focus on the polemic which characterised the death of peace in Europe during the war. Magritte captures this theme in this stark image of a totem bird of peace transformed into a leaf. This leaf is slowly decaying, being eaten away at the heart. Magritte draws the eye constantly to the face of the bird which bares a sad, resigned expression. The humanity which rests there is quite unsettling. Magritte’s use of light draws us to this expression again and again as the brightest point of the painting is at the top of the head of this poignant effigy. The red curtain signifies the encroaching of communism and secrecy, secrecy being the death of peace.

Below is an excerpt from my work using Neville Chamberlain’s famous speech declaring war with Germany in 1939. I have mixed this with other speeches from Winston Churchill and Adolf Hitler. This excerpt was created in SuperCollider (learn more about SuperCollider Here) and is a work in progress.

James Dickinson
Primrose Hill – Winter
Auerbach

Primrose Hill is widely known due to its clear view of the city beyond a more rural park area. This is primarily why I chose this piece; there are clear parallels with industry and nature, or synthetic and organic, in electroacoustic music. The fact that this is also a very textural piece, i.e. where brush strokes are unashamedly visible, shows that Auerbach’s apparent aggression when painting was somewhat intentional. I want to bring this out in my work, especially when you consider the irony that this is inevitably meant to be a picturesque scene:

primrosehill

©Shutterstock

Auerbach has actually created more than fifty versions of this work, which have been very useful in my research for the piece, especially with regard to Auerbach’s approach to glimmering light in the distance. I wanted to focus on these glimmers first, which are most likely representations of lamp posts – I wanted to use these as a primary motif as they seem to be the only instance of the modern world within the otherwise green park. I have replicated this by taking three sine waves, representing a pure but electronic-based medium, and slowly distorting them, primarily using a 50Hz buzz.